November 07, 2017 Volume 13 Issue 41

Electrical/Electronic News & Products

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Cool Tools: World's fastest digital ultra-high-speed camera

Vision Research has introduced the Phantom v2640, the fastest 4-Megapixel (MPx) camera available. It features a new proprietary 4-Mpx CMOS image sensor (2048 x 1952) that delivers unprecedented image quality at up to 26 Gpx/sec, while reaching 6,600 frames per second (fps) at full 2048 x 1952 resolution, and 11,750 fps at 1920 x 1080. This is an excellent tool for researchers, scientists, and engineers who need to capture clean, high-resolution images at super high speeds. Go to the Videos tab on the product webpage to see it in action.
Click here to learn more.

Alternatives to screws for compact electronics

Aluminum and stainless steel microPEM TackSert pins from Penn-Engineering provide cost-effective alternatives to micro screws for attaching top panels to base panels or chassis in compact electronic assemblies. They will attach top panels of any material to a base or chassis manufactured from common cast metals (such as magnesium and aluminum) or plastics (such as ABS and printed circuit boards). The pins ultimately eliminate many of the costs and issues associated with screws and integrate unique design features, promoting reliable and effective performance.
Click here to learn more.

New series of tall board-to-board stacker connectors

AVX Corporation has released a new series of tall board-to-board stacker connectors. The new 00-9148 Series tall stacker connectors are cost-effective, reliable, and robust; exhibit excellent resistance to shock and vibration; and help reduce tolerance accumulation in a variety of demanding applications across the automotive, consumer, medical, and industrial markets. The single-piece connectors also reduce assembly time and shorten BOM lists, and feature a double-row design with an 8-mm (+/- 0.2-mm) board-stacking height, a 1-mm pitch, and eight positions, each rated for 1A continuous current. Rated for 125 V, 50 cycles, and temperatures spanning -40 C to 125 C.
Click here to learn more.

Development kit for IoT applications

ON Semiconductor is helping engineers address a broader range of high-growth Internet of Things (IoT) applications through the release of a new multi-sensor shield and expansion of software support for its IoT Development Kit (IDK). The IDK gives access to a wide variety of sensing, processing, connectivity, and actuation possibilities through a range of shields/daughter cards that attach to the Arm SoC motherboard. The multi-sensor shield adds a variety of inertial and environmental sensors. These coupled with, for example, the recently announced Bluetooth low energy (BLE) connectivity shield, enable the rapid prototyping of a wide range of ultra-low power smart home, industrial IoT, and wearable solutions.
Click here to learn more.

AC and DC motorized impellers designed for demanding environments

Orion Fans has expanded its AC motorized impeller product offering with 14 new IP55-rated models and has added a new line of 24-V and 48-V DC motorized impellers with 13 models. The AC motorized impellers provide high airflow for a wide range of harsh and demanding applications. The DC motorized impellers deliver a low-power solution with standard control and monitoring features. The new motorized impeller models are available in popular 133-mm, 175-mm, 182-mm, 220-mm, and 225-mm sizes, expanding the existing range from 133 mm to 400 mm. They feature backward curved plastic or all-metal blades, sealed dual ball bearings, and rugged die-cast aluminum frames. All AC motorized impellers ship with the required capacitor. All DC motorized impeller models include a PWM and Tachometer function.
Learn about AC motorized impellers.
Learn about DC motorized impellers.

Smallest capacitive touch LED sensor display

Visual Communi-cations Company (VCC) recently launched the CSM Series surface-mount capacitive touch LED sensor, which boasts the smallest footprint in the industry. These displays are unique because they measure only 15.0 mm x 15.0 mm x 3.2 mm and can be surface mounted or even reverse mounted to save additional space. The compact, high-output LED sensor displays can be used in a wide range of applications, including: medical devices, home automation and mobile communication devices, as well as portable instruments. Available in green, yellow, red, blue, and white, these touch sensor displays provide streamlined manufacturing and enhanced product life cycle over a mechanical on/off switch because there are no mechanical components to wear down or break.
See these touch LED sensors in action.

High-current connector for high-end battery systems

Amphenol Industrial Products Group has enhanced its SurLok Plus high-current connector and cabling system. The quick connect and locking system includes a high-voltage interlock loop (HVIL) safety feature, as well as electromagnetic interference shielding (EMI) for noise immunity. These features are a requirement of high-end battery systems to ensure safety and proper operation. Ideal for use in electric vehicles, materials handling, hybrid electric vehicles, and in energy storage for commercial and residential battery storage systems, SurLok Plus is a reliable alternative to common compression lugs.
Click here to learn more.

Selection tips for rodless electromechanical and electric rod actuators

When you specify a linear actuator, some basic decisions come first. Do you go with electric or fluid-powered? Do you need the push/pull of an electric rod actuator or the load-carrying action of a rodless electromechanical actuator? Aaron Dietrich from Tolomatic may have your answer. Dietrich has compiled some very good tips for selecting these actuator types.
Learn about selecting linear actuators.

LED controller for automotive lighting designs

Texas Instruments (TI) has introduced the first 3-channel high-side linear automotive light-emitting diode (LED) controller without internal MOSFETs, which gives designers greater flexibility for their lighting designs. The TPS92830-Q1's novel architecture enables higher power and better thermal dissipation than conventional LED controllers, and is particularly beneficial for automotive LED lighting applications that require high performance and reliability. The LED controller's flexible on-board features give designers the freedom to select the best MOSFET for their system requirements. With this new approach, designers can optimize their lighting power designs more quickly and efficiently for automotive system requirements and desired dimming features.
Click here to learn more.

Filter fan kits with louvered sliding and hinged guards

Orion Fans has expanded the industry's lowest cost louvered filter fan kit to include sliding (LFGS Series, push/pull) and hinged (LFGH Series, flip-up) guard versions. Made up of a louvered sliding or hinged fan guard, filter, fan, metal guard, and hardware, the heavy-duty louvered filter fan kits simplify installation and reduce maintenance time and costs. They are easy to open, with no tools required to access the filter. Compared to regular grills or guards, the louvered filtered guards provide ingress protection as well as protecting fingers from fan blades. Standard filtering to 8 microns and specialty filters are available. Louvered guards feature UV protection. Filter fan kits are available with 120-, 172-, 180-, 200-, 225-, and 280-mm fans.
Click here to learn more.

Cartridge fuse for cooking appliances, photovoltaic systems

SCHURTER offers a robust, compact, and cost-effective cartridge fuse (part SHT) with increased breaking capacity and voltage ratings. The high breaking capacity up to 3,500 A at a nominal voltage of 250 VAC meets standards for commercial electric cooking appliances according to UL 197, while the 1,500 A at 500 VAC is suited for a broad range of industrial one- and three-phase systems such as photovoltaic systems and frequency converters for industrial automation. The fuse is also rated for DC applications up to 400 V.
Learn more about the SHT fuse.
Learn more about the SHT Pigtail fuse.

Alternatives to screws for compact electronics

Aluminum and stainless steel microPEM TackSert pins from Penn-Engineering provide cost-effective alternatives to micro screws for attaching top panels to base panels or chassis in compact electronic assemblies. They will attach top panels of any material to a base or chassis manufactured from common cast metals (such as magnesium and aluminum) or plastics (such as ABS and printed circuit boards). The pins ultimately eliminate many of the costs and issues associated with screws and integrate unique design features, promoting reliable and effective performance.
Click here to learn more.

Two-way piloting solenoid valve

The Lee Company’s new 2-way Piloting Solenoid Valve draws on the design elements of the company's ultra-compact and field-proven 3-way valve and provides a simplified flow path for applications requiring only two ports. MultiSeal technology radically simplifies port layout, offers significant space savings, reduces machining costs, and provides superior reliability over traditional sealing methods. Available biased either normally open or closed, and with lead wires or integral electrical connector, the single-coil 2-way Piloting Solenoid Valve weighs only 0.14 lb and consumes just 7.8 W at 28 VDC.
Click here to learn more.

Solving water leak inspection challenges on vehicle assembly lines

About 3% of new vehicles leave the factory with leaks large enough to cause mold growth and damage to expensive electronic components. ON Semiconductor and RFMicron have developed the Moisture Intrusion Detection System that automatically inspects vehicles for leaks at the end of the assembly process using battery-free wireless sensors at specific vehicle points to verify if those spots are wet or dry.
Read the full article.

Easy wire connection to PCB without wire soldering

In the fast-growing LED/lighting market, lead wire is a major component used in connecting a board to a lighting module. The conventional method of manually soldering the wire to a board presents limitations that result in a complicated assembly process and an unstable connection. Yokowo’s new one-action Lead Socket Connector, however, eliminates wire soldering and allows users to easily plug the lead wire into the socket. A two-contact lock structure ensures a reliable connection. Applications for the Lead Socket Connector include LED lighting, LCD television backlights, tablets, PCs, and any device where a lead wire must be soldered onto a PCB.
Click here to learn more.

Fiber optics competitor? 'Twisted' light could illuminate new path for wireless communications

Scientists have taken an important step toward using 'twisted' light as a form of wireless, high-capacity data transmission that could make fiber optics obsolete.

In a new report published Oct. 26 in the journal Science Advances, a team of physicists based in the UK, Germany, New Zealand, and Canada describe how new research into "optical angular momentum" (OAM) could overcome current difficulties with using twisted light across open spaces.

Scientists can 'twist' photons -- individual particles of light -- by passing them through a special type of hologram, similar to that on a credit card, giving the photons a twist known as optical angular momentum.

While conventional digital communications use photons as ones and zeroes to carry information, the number of intertwined twists in the photons allows them to carry additional data -- something akin to adding letters alongside the ones and zeroes. The ability of twisted photons to carry additional information means that optical angular momentum has the potential to create much higher-bandwidth communications technology.

While optical angular momentum techniques have already been used to transmit data across cables, transmitting twisted light across open spaces has been significantly more challenging for scientists to date. Even simple changes in atmospheric pressures across open spaces can scatter light beams and cause the spin information to be lost.

The researchers examined the effects on both the phase and intensity of OAM carrying light over a real link in an urban environment to assess the viability of these modes of quantum information transfer.

Their free-space link, in Erlangen, Germany, was 1.6 km in length and passed over fields and streets and close to high-rise buildings to accurately simulate an urban environment and atmospheric turbulence that can disrupt information transfer in space -- a thorough approach that will be instrumental in moving OAM research forward.

Conducting these field tests in a real urban environment has revealed exciting new challenges that must be overcome before systems can be made commercially available. Previous studies had indicated the potential feasibly of OAM communication systems but had not fully characterized the effects of turbulent air on the phase of the structured light propagating over links of this length.

Dr. Martin Lavery, head of the Structured Photonics Research Group at University of Glasgow, is the lead author on the team's research paper. Dr Lavery said: "In an age where our global data consumption is growing at an exponential rate, there is mounting pressure to discover new methods of information carrying that can keep up with the huge uptake in data across the world.

"A complete, working optical angular momentum communications system capable of transmitting data wirelessly across free space has the potential to transform online access for developing countries, defense systems, and cities around the world.

"Free-space optics is a solution that can potentially give us the bandwidth of fiber, but without the requirement for physical cabling.

"This study takes vital steps forward in the journey towards high-dimensional free-space optics that can be a cheaper, more accessible alternative to buried fiber optics connections."

The turbulent atmosphere used in this experiment highlighted the fragility of shaped phase fronts, particularly for those that would be integral to high-bandwidth data transfers. This study indicated the challenges future adaptive optical systems will be required to resolve.

Dr. Lavery added: "With these new developments, we are confident that we can now re-think our approaches to channel modelling and the requirement places on adaptive optics systems. We are getting ever closer to developing OAM communications that can be deployed in a real urban setting.

"We want to start a conversation about the issues that need to be addressed and how we are going to move towards the resolution."

Dr. Lavery undertook the work in partnership with researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light and Institute of Optics, and the Universities of Otago, Ottawa, and Rochester.

These findings allow researchers to address challenges -- not previously observed -- in developing adaptive optics for quantum information transfer to move closer towards a new age of free-space optics that will eventually replace fiber optics as a functional mode of communication in urban environments and remote sensing systems.

The paper, titled "Free-space propagation of high dimensional structured optical fields in an urban environment," is published in Science Advances. The work was funded by Royal Academy of Engineering, EPSRC, and supported by the International Max Planck Partnership.

Source: University of Glasgow

Published November 2017

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