July 10, 2018 Volume 14 Issue 26

Materials News & Products

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New food-grade high-performance PEEK polymers

To help OEMs meet the stringent regulatory and quality demands affecting the food equipment industry, Victrex is introducing a dedicated PEEK food-grade portfolio. Compared to metal components, the new VICTREX FG family of high-performing thermoplastics offers additional benefits in terms of cost effectiveness, productivity, and performance for OEMs -- and the neutral taste expected by consumers. In addition, with the adoption of Industry 4.0 technology, VICTREX PEEK can offer food and beverage manufacturers the opportunity to optimize efficiency and reduce production costs, when compared to the use of metals.
Learn more.


How specialized coatings can make mechanical parts harder for extreme industrial applications

Although bearings, gears, rollers, and other precision components are generally made of hardened steel or metal alloys, those used in high-load applications still can fail due to excessive wear, surface fatigue, pitting, galling, and corrosion. To address this problem, product engineers and component manufacturers often turn to specialized PVD (physical vapor deposition) coatings that can further harden the surface of these parts. Oerlikon Balzers provides solid solutions.
Read the full article.


New carbon fiber material for SAAM additive systems from Cincinnati Inc.

Cincinnati Inc. (CI) has released a new carbon fiber resin material for its SAAM (Small Area Additive Manufacturing) fused filament fabrication 3D-printing system. The new material is impact resistant, lightweight, and has a very high strength-to-weight ratio. Carbon fiber reinforcement makes the material stiff, durable, and very low warping -- and advanced inter-layer adhesion results in accurate, quality parts with good dimensions. The material's superior surface finish makes it perfect for custom tooling applications, as well as assembly, CMM, welding, and CNC fixtures.
Learn more about the carbon fiber material.
Learn more about Small Area Additive Manufacturing system.


World's first particle foam based on polyethersulfone

After two years of intensive research, BASF is now able to present prototypes of the world's first particle foam based on polyethersulfone (PESU). The foam is characterized by its unique combination of properties: high-temperature resistance, inherent flame retardancy, and extreme light weight coupled with great stiffness and strength. It is therefore particularly well suited for complex-shaped components in cars, airplanes, and trains.
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New hybrid nylon TPEs are tough, flexible, and more

Nylon Corporation of America has launched an extended product family of nylon (polyamide) -based thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs), also known as polyether-block-amides (PEBA), for a range of applications in the automotive, sporting goods, personal electronics, composite, and specialty films markets. These materials are block copolymers of nylon segments and polyether segments. The nylon block is the hard segment and the polyether block is the soft, flexible segment. NY-FLEX grades are thus hybrid materials, offering a unique combination of rubber-like elastomeric properties and thermoplastic-like processing capabilities. By varying the type and the ratio of these two blocks, a wide range of NY-FLEX grades can be offered.
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High-hardness 3D-printing materials

If your vision of the future is 3D printing your own high-hardness steel bearings right at your location on demand, your wish has been granted. A new development from the NanoSteel Company supports the market need for on-demand, on-site wear parts while addressing the current challenges in 3D printing of high-hardness parts. NanoSteel's powder alloy overcomes one of the major hurdles to achieving a high-hardness metallic part through additive manufacturing: the tendency to develop cracks during part builds. The company worked with a global process development partner to optimize processing of a proprietary NanoSteel alloy with a high-volume fraction of borocarbide phases. This successfully produced a fully dense (99.9 percent) crack-free part with hardness values over 1000 HV, wear resistance comparable to conventionally manufactured M2 tool steels, and a uniform microstructure.
Click here to learn more.


New advanced titanium alloy for high-temperature aerospace

Arconic has announced the commercial availability of an advanced titanium alloy called ARCONIC-THOR that is designed for higher temperature applications in next-gen aero engines and adjacent structures. This patented material is nearly 50 percent lighter than incumbent nickel-based superalloys. The proprietary formulation also demonstrates three times improved oxidation resistance compared to existing high-temp titanium alloys. Arconic has completed successful development projects of ARCONIC-THOR with the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, Boeing, and Honeywell. A new project is in the works with Lockheed Martin.
Learn more about the ARCONIC-THOR alloy.
Read about Arconic's agreement with Lockheed Martin.


Odorless thermal insulation material for automotive

Interface Performance Materials introduces TI650 and TI1K innovative thermal insulation materials for automotive and heavy-duty vehicle heat shield applications. TI650 and TI1K are the first odorless and smokeless materials specifically formulated for three-layer heat shields in the automotive, medium-, and heavy-duty vehicle applications. These non-toxic materials withstand temps up to 1,000 C (1,832 F), are malleable, and are resistant to cracking when molded into a layered heat shield. Their low-density makeup makes them the ideal substrates for lightweight initiatives by OEMs and fabricators. A highly inorganic material, TI1K is also unique in its ability to meet the ASTM E136 flammability test standard with no detectable smoke.
Learn more.


Get 'Digital Manufacturing for Dummies' book gratis

Proto Labs has put together a comprehensive guide to the major 3D-printing, CNC machining, and injection-molding technologies that are frequently used in digital manufacturing. The book helps readers to compare processes, explore material options, and see how digital manufacturing can fit into every stage of the product life cycle.
Get your copy on the house.


Precision ceramic and glass microcomponents

Goodfellow, a favorite materials provider for Designfax readers, also supplies a wide variety of ceramic and glass microcomponents, both standard items and items precision-machined to customer specifications. Examples include: ultra-thin glass microsheet for use as transparent substrates and electrical insulators; precision spheres for use as precision spacers and optical components; micro optics such as prisms, lenses, and windows; injection-molded ceramic microcomponents for surgical equipment and fiber-optic applications; polished sapphire bearings and sub-mm bore nozzles; and single- and multi-bore capillary tubing. Other items are available upon request.
Learn more.


Smith Metal Products adds Titanium Metal Injection Molding capabilities

Smith Metal Products has added Titanium Metal Injection Molding (TiMIM) capabilities to its MIM portfolio of materials that include stainless steels, alloys, and ceramics. TiMIM involves mixing powdered Titanium metal with a binder material to compose a feedstock capable of being handled by injection molding equipment. Metal injection molding allows complex Titanium parts to be shaped with precision in a single operation and in high volume as compared to traditional Titanium machined metal components.
Learn more.


Entry-level industrial-grade 3D printer

The FabPro 1000 from 3D Systems is a new entry-level system that packs 30 years of industrial 3D-printing know-how into its design to deliver superior quality at up to 3X faster high-throughput print speeds than competing printers. Digital Light Printing (DLP) Stereolithography uses a projector to image each layer within a UV-curable, liquid plastic material. This easy-to-use system, with a build size of 125 x 70 x 120 mm (4.92 x 2.76 x 4.72 in.), has 3D Sprint file preparation and print software included -- all at a price of $4,995.
Learn more about it.


Polyplastics develops metal-resin bonding tech for automotive and electrical/electronics

Polyplastics (Tokyo), a global supplier of engineering thermoplastics, has developed an innovative technology for direct metal-resin bonding, a process that uses metal insert molding. Metal parts and resins are firmly bonded by introducing molten resin through injection molding to metal parts that have already undergone sufficient surface treatment. Metal-resin composites deliver the properties of metals (high rigidity, electrical conductivity) and engineering plastics (low density, electrical insulation). This technology has overcome the many factors that traditionally have had an adverse effect and prevented stable bonding. Polyplastics has a U.S. presence in Farmington Hills, MI.
Click here to learn more.


Surface treatment available for strongest cast aluminum alloy

General Magnaplate Corp. has made an exclusive license agreement with the U.K.'s Poeton Industries for the Apticote A20X surface enhancement process, used for treating the innovative A20X aluminum alloy. A20X is MMPDS certified (as AA205) and is the strongest cast aluminum alloy available today, with strength properties comparable to 7000 series wrought material. A20X cast and additively manufactured parts are in production today for major aerospace customers. The AptiMag-X treatment enhances the surface of A20X parts, improving wear resistance, hardening, and finish. The agreement means that General Magnaplate will become the exclusive supplier of Apticote A20X, which they will brand AptiMag-X in North America. Licensed A20X foundries, additive manufacturing companies, and aerospace customers will be able to have parts treated with AptiMag-X at the company’s facilities in Linden, NJ, and Arlington, TX.
Click here to learn more.


New light and tough structural compounds

RTP Company has developed new light and tough (LT) Compounds, a series of thermoplastic compounds that weigh 5 to 10 percent less than typical filled compounds, but with equivalent mechanical properties and similar shrinkage values. LT Compounds are a fast and easy way to accomplish weight reductions in parts molded with glass fiber reinforcement without compromising performance or requiring modifications to existing tools. They are best used as lightweight alternatives when the goal is to minimize energy consumption or the amount of human effort required to use the part.
Click here to learn more.


Scientists discover a link between superconductivity and the periodic table

Scientists from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and Skoltech have demonstrated the high-temperature superconductivity of actinium hydrides and discovered a general principle for calculating the superconductivity of hydrides based on the periodic table alone. The results of their study were published in March in The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.

High-temperature superconductivity is a phenomenon of zero electrical resistance in certain materials at temperatures above -196 C (the temperature of liquid nitrogen) that physicists, chemists, and materials scientists worldwide have been intensely researching for decades, as room-temperature superconductors open up vast prospects for the power industry, transport, and other technology-driven sectors.

Scientists in Moscow propose that p0 and d1 metals with low-lying empty orbitals tend to form phonon-mediated high-temperature superconducting (HTSC) metal polyhydrides. The correlation to the pattern in the periodic table may help identify promising superconducting materials more quickly. [Credit: Dmitrii V. Semenok et al./The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters]

 

 

 

 

Currently, the record holder in high-temperature superconductivity is hydrogen sulfide (H3S), which functions as a superconductor at 1.5 million atmospheres and temperatures down to -70 C. Such pressure levels can only be attained in a lab environment, not in real life, and the temperature is way below room temperature, so the search continues for new superconductors. Perhaps an even higher-temperature superconductivity can be attained in metal-hydrogen compounds. Yet the link between chemical composition and superconductivity was unclear, leaving scientists to puzzle it all out by trial and error.

A group of chemists led by Artem R. Oganov, professor at Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and Skoltech, recently discovered that certain elements capable of forming superconducting compounds are arranged in a specific pattern in the periodic table.

They theorized that high-temperature superconductivity develops in substances containing metal atoms that come close to populating a new electronic subshell. Metal atoms inside the crystal are thought to become highly sensitive to the positions of the neighboring atoms, which results in strong electron-phonon interaction -- the underlying effect of conventional superconductivity.

Based on this assumption and looking at the periodic table, the scientists supposed that high-temperature superconductivity could occur in actinium hydrides -- substances that fit the desired subshell pattern. Their supposition was verified and confirmed: superconductivity was predicted for AcH16 at temperatures of -69 to -22 C at 1.5 million atmospheres.

"The very idea of a connection between superconductivity and the periodic table was first put forward by Dmitry Semenok, a student at my lab," said Oganov. The principle he discovered is very simple, and it is really amazing that no one had hit upon it before."

Source: Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Published April 2018

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